BASF at ACS

Presentation Schedule

Monday, April 11, 2016

8:30 - 10:00 AM

Tutorial 4: Waterborne High-Performance Coatings

Ivan Tyre, Alberdingk Boley & Lori Boggs, BASF

Abstract
Waterborne coating is a fast developing technology. In many applications, these systems have become a standard solution, replacing their solventborne counterparts. In some important clearcoat or topcoat applications, however, solventborne systems remain the preferred technology. This tutorial aims to discuss what is possible today with waterborne clearcoats for different substrates — including wood and metal — and what is not. It covers the theory behind different binder technologies, as well as fundamental aspects of the film formation process and the performance of these coatings systems. This tutorial will also cover some fundamental aspects of rheology for waterborne applications.

Speaker Bio
Lori Boggs has been with BASF for over 23 years. Currently, she holds the roles of Technical Team Leader for the Technical Services group and the Technical Specialist for waterborne protective resins in the Dispersions & Pigments division. Over the course of her tenure with BASF, Lori has held roles in the Automotive OEM Coatings division where she formulated both waterborne and solventborne basecoats. Much of her career has been spent observing the spray application of automotive topcoats to determine what rheological measurements provide clues to optimizing the flow and appearance characteristics of coatings. Lori has a PhD in Chemical Engineering from the University of Michigan where she studied the mechanism of rheology control of coatings containing microgels.

Lori Boggs, Ph.D
BASF Corporation
(248) 304-5302
lori.boggs@basf.com

2:00 – 2:30 PM

2.1 New Generation of Nonionic Non-Gelling Surfactants for Emulsion Polymerization

Greg Drewno, BASF

Abstract
Nonionic surfactants play an important role in the stabilization of polymer dispersions. They contribute to the storage-, electrolyte-, shear- and freeze/thaw stability. They can be used as co-surfactants during the polymerization process or be post-added after the reaction. In both cases they need to be added in a concentrated form to an aqueous phase and will therefore undergo dilution. Many nonionic surfactants show a gel phase and produce gel agglomerates when they are added rapidly into water. This is a serious handling issue in the co-emulsification as well as post treatment step. Known solutions to this are the addition of gel breakers to the surfactants which in some cases contribute to VOC or have no surfactant activity (like PEGs) and therefore lower the active matter of the product. We have developed a new surfactant that can be easily diluted with water in any desired ratio without showing gel phases. This is achieved without the addition of a VOC or inactive matter. The product also shows a very low pour point which is a great advantage for storage and handling in typical winter weather conditions. The performance of this new surfactant class will be compared to market standards and its benefits will be highlighted.

Speaker Bio
Greg Drewno is a Technical Service Representative in the Care Chemicals Formulation Technologies division of BASF Corporation located in Wyandotte, MI. He is responsible for surfactants and application technology in emulsion polymerization, coatings, construction and chemical processing industries. Greg received his Bachelors of Science in Chemistry from the University of Michigan. Greg has 29 years of industry experience working in research and development, and applications. He has expertise in architectural coatings, powder coatings, hard surface cleaning and personal care formulation. Greg has authored or co-authored 16 patents and is currently a member of the Surfactants for Emulsion Polymerization Global Platform Team.

Greg Drewno
BASF Corporation
(734) 324-6421
gregory.drewno@basf.com

3:00 – 3:30 PM

4.3 Optimized Binder-TiO2 Interaction for Maximal Hiding Power

Nicholas Foley, BASF

Abstract
The very high refractive index of titanium dioxide (TiO2) makes its contribution to opacity, or hiding power, invaluable in paint formulations. However, the high cost of TiO2 demands its efficient utilization in coatings. Here we outline advanced analytical techniques that were used to design binder systems which give rise to highly distributed and efficient TiO2-based coatings. Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM) is a technique that allows the observation of interactions between binder and TiO2 during the drying phase of a coating. While X-ray disc centrifugation can be used to resolve particle size distributions. The combination of these methods can be used to realize when a binder reaches optimal pigment interaction and when those interactions become too dominant. Thus one could differentiate whether the loss of hiding power is due to binder-induced pigment flocculation (bridging flocculation) or instability-induced pigment aggregation.

Speaker Bio
Nicholas Foley has been with BASF for 6 years and his research has spanned from urethanes to acrylics with a focus on various applications including construction, adhesives and architectural paints. He earned his chemistry PhD from North Carolina State University and a biochemistry BS from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Nicholas always enjoys the challenge of pushing a technology to a new boundary and is currently a scientist for the architectural coatings group in Charlotte, North Carolina.

Dr. Nicholas Foley
BASF Corp.
704.587.7936
nicholas.foley@basf.com

5:00 - 5:30 PM

2.6 Dispersing Agent for Solventborne, High-End Industrial Pigment Concentrates

Arne Rick, BASF

Abstract
In this paper we show how our recent developments using nitroxyl-mediated polymerization resulted in a high performance dispersing agent suitable for a wide range of pigments in high end applications with broad compatibility towards various co-grind resins as well as let-down systems. In addition we show how gradient chromatography enabled us to determine the polymer’s structure and optimize manufacturing process conditions to achieve the desired structural integrity of the dispersant.
These results will allow formulators to further optimize the rheology, transparency, color, stability and cost of pigment dispersions in order to generate maximum value-in-use for their applications.

Speaker Bio
Arne Rick is an expert formulator of industrial and automotive coating systems. Arne holds a degree in chemical engineering from the Hamburg University of Applied Sciences and an MBA from Wake Forest University. As a Six Sigma Black Belt certified technical advisor with BASF Formulation Additives, Arne is dedicated to advancing his customers’ formulations with his passion for chemistry.

Arne Rick
BASF Corporation
704.587.1832
arne.rick@basf.com

POSTER

p.17 Novel Hindered Amine Light Stabilizer for the Stabilization of Coatings

Mervin Wood, BASF

Abstract
Sterically hindered amines have been used since the early 1970s to stabilize polymers and resin binders on a commercial scale. These substances are almost exclusively derivatives of 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl piperidine and are generally referred to as HALS, which is an acronym for Hindered Amine Light Stabilizer(s). They act as radical scavengers in the autoxidation cycle and inhibit the photo-oxidative degradation of polymers. The mode of action of HALS is largely independent of the film thickness applied which means they can also act at the coating surface where there is minimal protection from ultraviolet light. In clear coats, HALS protect against surface defects such as gloss loss or cracking, whereas in pigmented coatings chalking and discoloration can be prevented. These surface defects eventually lead to increased water permeability, loss of physical and protective properties followed by substrate erosion. A novel hindered amine light stabilizer will be discussed that can be utilized in polar coatings that gives no initial drop in gloss due to exudation and can be used in acid catalyzed systems without delaying cure as judged by pendulum hardness.

Speaker Bio
Mervin Wood is part of the BASF’s Transportation and Industrial Coatings Technical Services group located in Southfield, Michigan. As a Technical Expert, he is responsible for technical support for UV absorbers, light stabilizers, and antioxidants for NAFTA. Previously, Dr. Wood has held positions in Process Development, Coatings Research, Toll and Stilbenics Manufacturing, and Intellectual Property at the McIntosh, AL and/or Tarrytown, NY sites, all within Ciba/BASF since 1988.
He has over 80 US patents, 20 technical publications and given tutorials on the degradation of organic coatings at the International Coatings Exposition. He holds a Bachelor’s of Science degree in chemistry from University of Kentucky and a Ph.D. in synthetic organic chemistry from the Emory University.

Mervin G. Wood, Ph.D.
BASF Corporation
(248) 304-5328
mervin.wood@basf.com

POSTER

p.21 Alternate Crosslinkig System for Wood Coatings

Sunitha Grandhee, Rajesh Kumar, Xiaopei Deng, Nikolay Lebedinski & William Wu, BASF

Abstract
Carbodiimides based on aromatic isocyanates have not been explored industrially as crosslinkers for interior applications. Crosslinking aromatic carbodiimides with acid functional polymers, has advantages over traditional 2K PU coatings. It leads to coatings with no residual isocyanate monomer which can be a great benefit from health and safety standpoint. In addition, the crosslinking happens at room temperature, so the coatings can be applied to heat sensitive substrates e.g wood, plastics etc. This crosslinking chemistry also has applications to coatings for various market segments like construction, transportation and industrial. This topic will cover the earlier challenges faced in bringing this chemistry towards commercial success and how the challenges have been mitigated and has paved a way for bringing an alternate crosslinking system which can have potential beyond wood coatings.

Speaker Bio
Sunitha Grandhee is a Business Development Manager for the Isocyanates division located in Wyandotte, Michigan. She is responsible for new business development and marketing for aromatic isocyanates. Previously, Dr. Grandhee has held positions in research and development, product development, and technical marketing for automotive and Industrial coatings. She holds many patents, and technical publications and has given talks on waterborne emulsion coatings and high solids solvent-borne polymers. She holds a Ph.D. in synthetic organic chemistry and is a Six Sigma blackbelt.


Sunitha Grandhee, Ph.D.
BASF Corporation
(734) 324-5287
Sunitha.Grandhee@basf.com

Tuesday, April 12, 2016

2:00 – 2:30 PM

9.1 New Plasticizing Co-Monomer for Use in Emulsion Polymerisation

Greg Drewno, BASF

Abstract
Nonionic surfactants play an important role in the stabilization of polymer dispersions. They contribute to the storage-, electrolyte-, shear- and freeze/thaw stability. They can be used as co-surfactants during the polymerization process or be post-added after the reaction. In both cases they need to be added in a concentrated form to an aqueous phase and will therefore undergo dilution. Many nonionic surfactants show a gel phase and produce gel agglomerates when they are added rapidly into water. This is a serious handling issue in the co-emulsification as well as post treatment step. Known solutions to this are the addition of gel breakers to the surfactants which in some cases contribute to VOC or have no surfactant activity (like PEGs) and therefore lower the active matter of the product.
We have developed a new surfactant that can be easily diluted with spotwater in any desired ratio without showing gel phases. This is achieved without the addition of a VOC or inactive matter. The product also shows a very low pour point which is a great advantage for storage and handling in typical winter weather conditions. The performance of this new surfactant class will be compared to market standards and its benefits will be highlighted.

Speaker Bio
Greg Drewno is a Technical Service Representative in the Care Chemicals Formulation Technologies division of BASF Corporation located in Wyandotte, MI. He is responsible for surfactants and application technology in emulsion polymerization, coatings, construction and chemical processing industries. Greg received his Bachelors of Science in Chemistry from the University of Michigan. Greg has 29 years of industry experience working in research and development, and applications. He has expertise in architectural coatings, powder coatings, hard surface cleaning and personal care formulation. Greg has authored or co-authored 16 patents and is currently a member of the Surfactants for Emulsion Polymerization Global Platform Team.

Greg Drewno
BASF Corporation
(734) 324-6421
gregory.drewno@basf.com

2:00 – 2:30 PM

11.1 Formulating Water-Based, High-Gloss DTM Topcoats with the Aid of High Throughput Screening

Vincent Goldman, BASF

Abstract
Environmental legislation mandating the reduction of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in coatings continues to be a primary driver in the development of binder systems for various markets. Manipulation of various technologies is allowing for the design of acrylic binders with improved appearance and performance characteristics while having a low VOC content. Critical formulation considerations also help determine the viability of newly developed acrylic dispersions for low VOC applications. Paramount among these formulation variables is the determination of optimum coalescent agents (cosolvents) and type and amount of dispersing agent. This study demonstrates how the use of a high throughput facility expedites the choice of a coalescent package and amount of dispersant for a DTM coating formulation using a newly developed acrylic dispersion. The high throughput methods for robotic formulation, application and characterization in concert with design of experiment are explored in this paper.

Speaker Bio
Vincent Goldman has over 25 years of experience formulating automotive and industrial coatings for: Akzo Sikkens, Transtar Autobody Technologies and, currently, BASF. He is an undergraduate from Michigan State University and completed his graduate studies at University of Detroit. Vincent is currently focused on the science of formulation namely enumerating structure property relationships in multiple component systems.


Vincent Goldman
BASF Corporation
(248) 304-5310
Vincent.j.goldman@basf.com

2:30 – 3:00 PM

10.2 Formulating to Minimize Film Defects in 100 g/L Solventborne 2K Polyurethane Coatings

Clifford Seipke, BASF

Abstract
Coatings formulators around the globe share the challenge of creating coatings with ever decreasing VOC levels. In the United States and Canada, this is frequently achieved through judicious use of solvents that are exempt from VOC regulation. Specifically within California’s SCAQMD however, formulators need to create coatings as low as 100 g/L VOC, and are limited to a very select few VOC-exempt solvents. Unfortunately, those few VOC-exempt solvents have the tendency to cause defects in a coating during the drying and curing stage, such as solvent popping and low gloss. This formulation study examines the basic components in a 100 g/L solventborne 2K polyurethane coating system, including polyols, solvents, and formulation additives to minimize film defects.

Speaker Bio
Clifford Seipke is the Technical Specialist for Joncryl® & Sovermol® polyols and Basonat® polyisocyanates in the technical service group of BASF’s Dispersions & Pigments division.  Prior to this, he has held a variety of technical roles in the coatings and printing & packaging groups within the division. Between BASF and his former employers Alcan Packaging and Dow Automotive, he has over 12 years of experience in the coatings, inks, and adhesives industries.  Cliff earned his B.S. in Environmental Chemistry from Kettering University, and is pursuing a M.S. in Polymer and Coatings Technology at Eastern Michigan University.

Clifford Seipke
BASF Corporation
(248) 304-5325
clifford.seipke@basf.com

3:00 – 3:30 PM

10.3 New NMP-Free Acrylic Polyurethane Hybrid Dispersion for Excellent Mechanical Resistance

Jennifer Long-Susewitz, BASF

Abstract
Polyurethane dispersions have been widely used in the furniture and flooring industry and are often blended with an acrylic resin to achieve desired coatings performance properties. This paper will focus on a new NMP-free acrylic polyurethane hybrid dispersion which achieves the properties of excellent taber abrasion, high hardness, and chemical resistance preferred of coatings for flooring and medium to high quality furniture.

Speaker Bio
Jennifer Long-Susewitz has been at BASF in a technical services role since 2007. Her background is in waterbased coatings for wood and concrete.  Since 2013, she has held the role of Technical Specialist for waterbased and UV curable coatings for the furniture and flooring market.  Jen has a bachelor's degree in chemistry from the University of Michigan and an MBA from Northeastern University.

Jennifer Long-Susewitz
BASF Corporation
(248) 304-5317
jennifer.long@basf.com

4:00 – 4:30 PM

11.4 Block-Resistance of Low-VOC Waterborne Direct-to-Metal Coatings

Aditi Chavannavar, BASF

Abstract
The regulatory push to reduce volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions has led to the development of softer water-based binders with lower minimum film forming temperatures (MFFT). These soft polymers have a strong tendency to adhere to one another or ‘block’. Block resistance is a measure of the ability of a coating to resist adhesion to itself or to another substrate especially when freshly coated parts are stacked together at elevated temperatures. Anti-block agents that migrate to the surface of a film have been shown to function as a release layer which is responsible for the reduction of block. In this study, additives that demonstrate anti-block characteristics have been evaluated for low VOC waterborne direct-to-metal coatings to investigate block improvement as well as to examine the effect of these surface active agents on the corrosion resistance and water sensitivity of the coating.

Speaker Bio
Aditi Chavannavar is a Technical Specialist concentrating on Transportation, Industrial Coatings & Plastics. Aditi completed a PhD in organic chemistry from the University of Illinois, where she developed new methodologies for C-O bond formation. She then completed post-doctoral research at the University of Notre Dame working on phosphorus mediated C-N bond construction. Aditi joined BASF in June of 2015 as a technical specialist responsible for the epoxy curing agents, amino resins and polyurethane dispersion product lines. In her current role, she provides product recommendations and technical support to customers.

Aditi Chavannavar
BASF Corporation
(248) 304-5305
aditi.chavannavar@basf.com

4:30 – 5:00 PM

9.5 Modeling of Total Solar Reflectance as a Formulation Tool

Wally Kesler, BASF

Abstract
New uses for Solar Heat Management coatings are expanding demand beyond the traditional building products markets. Applications including transportation, consumer comfort, and safety join energy conservation as areas where Near IR reflective pigments can add value by protecting thermally sensitive substrates.
What if the formulation process for these coatings included modelling the reflectance behavior of the surface before a drop of paint was made? The best candidates for the application could be chosen, minimizing trial and error and cost, in the development process.
This paper outlines the formulation process for a Solar Heat Management coating utilizing proprietary modelling software to predict the Total Solar Reflectance (TSR) of a trial coating. Examples illustrate the influence of formulation and substrate on predicted and measured TSR values.

Speaker Bio
Wally Kesler is a Technical Specialist concentrating on pigments for Industrial Coatings. Wally completed his MS Degree in Polymer and Coatings Technology at Eastern Michigan University and a Bachelor of Science degree in Chemistry at Michigan Technological University. Joining BASF in 2013, Wally has over twenty-five years of experience formulating coatings including developing coatings utilized for heat management.

You're invited

BASF cordially invites you to join us for a cocktail reception
during the American Coatings Show in Indianapolis, IN.

Drop by Booth #1431 and enjoy beer, wine and hors d’oeuvres and discuss your coating formulation needs with us.